Center for Climate Change calls on govt to invest in sustainable food systems and rural development Center for Climate Change calls on govt to invest in sustainable food systems and rural development
  The Center for Climate Change and Food Security (CCCFC) has called on Government of Ghana to invest in Sustainable Food production and rural... Center for Climate Change calls on govt to invest in sustainable food systems and rural development

 

The Center for Climate Change and Food Security (CCCFC) has called on Government of Ghana to invest in Sustainable Food production and rural development to enable the country meet growing food demand.
 
According to CCCFC  this will help to address some of the major global challenges from feeding the world’s growing population to protecting the global climate, tackling the causes of migration and displacement
 
This was contained in a statement issued Tuesday October 16,2018 on World Food Day.
 
 Bellow is the full statement issued .
 
PRESS RELEASE
 
OCTOBER 16TH, 2018
 
WORLD FOOD DAY – CCCFS CONCERNS
 
On this day, October 16, 2018, we would like to congratulate all farmers and all those who make food available to mankind.
 
We at the Centre for Climate Change & Food Security (CCCFS) greet you and we appreciate your hard work that is aimed at sustaining lives.
 
The World Food Day is a day to show commitment to the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 which is – to achieve Zero Hunger by 2030.
 
It is also a day for us to celebrate the progress we have already made towards reaching #ZeroHunger.
 
The right to food is a basic human right and therefore it is important for every country including Ghana to invest in sustainable food systems and rural development.
 
This will help to address some of the major global challenges from feeding the world’s growing population to protecting the global climate, tackling the causes of migration and displacement.
 
Achieving the 17 SDGs would never come to pass if we don’t end hunger, maintain sustainable, resilient climate -compatible agriculture and food systems.
 
Out of the 129 countries monitored by Food Agriculture Organisation,  72 have already achieved the target of halving the proportion of people who suffer from hunger by 2015. Over the past 20 years, the likelihood of a child dying before age five has been nearly cut down by half, with about 17,000 children saved every day. Extreme poverty rates have also been cut down by half since 1990.
 
Now what is the situation here in Ghana?
 
Several reports have indicated that over the past decade, chronic malnutrition or stunting among children under 5, has reduced from 23 to 19 percent across the country.
 
But the reports were clear in some regions especially in the  Northern Region where the situation has rather increased marginally to 33 percent and reaches peaks of 40 percent in some districts.
 
The reports also say that, micronutrient deficiencies, referred to as hidden hunger, persist and four out of ten women of reproductive age and six out of ten children under 5, are anaemic.
 
The Cost of Hunger in Africa (COHA) study on Ghana reveals that the country loses 6.4 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP) annually to child undernutrition.
 
The report underscores the importance of nutrition to human development and national socio-economic transformation.
 
In other instances, it says that farming communities in the north have few alternative livelihood opportunities, which is why WFP’s work in Ghana also focuses on building resilience.
 
CCCFS CONCERNS
 
Our concerns are not just about availability of food, our concerns are largely about accessibility of food  by many Ghanaians.
 
We at CCCFS have been monitoring the situation across borders and we can say that food accessibility isn’t better in our country.
 
Even where there are foods, the one who struggles to cultivate them begin to lose hope because he cannot recoup the money he invested mainly due to two reasons;
 
1) Poor harvest
2) lack of market or poor market.
 
The first has to do with climate change which we know is greatly affecting farmers. Now, if the farmer can’t produce enough, he cannot equally feed his family and sell to others.
 
Automatically, we can say that, when the farmer gets hungry, the nation gets hungry.
 
In one of our research works in the Bono Ahafo, Northern, Upper East and part of Upper West regions, we found out that farmers are abandoning their farmlands not because they are not interested in farming but because they can no longer deal with the changing weather.
 
The effect of that is, families within farming communities can only survive by buying foodstuffs.
 
This is a worrying trend we have found.
 
2) lack of market or poor pricing of farm produce is one big problem for farmers.
 
We will like to use Atebubu yam market for instance, to make our case.
 
That market brings together trucks of yam everyday. It is a place which is left at the mercy of the weather or disappointing prices.
 
In our last visit to the town, prices of 100 tubers of yam have declined from 1,200 in the past to 600 Ghana Cedis now.
 
But we do know that Ghana is a major exporter of yams, accounting for over 90 percent of total annual volumes exported from West Africa.
 
It is estimated that five hundred by five hundred meter size of cultivated farmland yields 50 thousand tubers of yam, with a street value of 50 thousand dollars.
 
Unfortunately, farmers there are getting a little or no attention at all from exporters as it used to happen in the past.
 
So what happens to the income of the farmer? How do we expect them to continue to supply food to the country if all isn’t well with them?
 
We think that a policy shift is critical in ensuring government monitors and controls price fluctuation.
 
We are aware that in 2012, government formulated the Ghana Yam Sector Development Strategy to support production, value addition and commercialization of the commodity.
 
The strategy was a public-private initiative, championed by the Ministry of Food and Agriculture as well as Ministry of Trade and Industry.
 
The then Trade Minister, Haruna Iddrisu, indicated the strategy was meant to improve yam value chain and position Ghana’s produce as “food for the world”.
 
We are asking whether the initiative has really addressed the challenge of yam farmers or not?
 
Yes, we want to know now because yam farmers are the losers in this game and this means government must make some positive moves for the sector to thrive.
 
Thank you.
 
Website: www.cfccfs.org
Email: info@cfccfs.org
CCCFS – Healthy Environment, Nutritious Food & Healthy People.