Second hand Vehicles to be banned as Ghana moves to implement vehicle fuel economy standards Second hand Vehicles to be banned as Ghana moves to implement vehicle fuel economy standards
Ghana’s  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the UN Environment and other partner agencies, and Ministries of Transport, and Energy, and the Drivers... Second hand Vehicles to be banned as Ghana moves to implement vehicle fuel economy standards
Ghana’s  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in collaboration with the UN Environment and other partner agencies, and Ministries of Transport, and Energy, and the Drivers and Vehicle Licensing Authority have succesfuly undertaken an inventory on the vehicular fleet and inspection evolutions in Ghana from 2005 to 2016 as part of steps to develop policy options for fuel economy in the country .
Over  one million vehicles of all types were imported into the country from 2005 to 2016 out of which 80% were Second -hand  vehicles ,according to available statistics from the Ghana Revenue Authority, Customs Division.
These Vehicles obviously have high CO2 emission levels due to weak engines creating more environmental mess for Ghana with negative health implications and greenhouse effect .
Apart from this , the vehicles, which are the mainstay of Ghana’s transport sector, consume more than half of the total oil import and production of the nation.

A workshop to share policy strategy for implementing the vehicle fuel economy standard policy in Ghana to tackle this challenge has been held in Accra.The Policy will among other things ban the importation of second-hand Vehicles with “obsolete” engines hence with high emissions  dangerous to the environment.

Addressing the participants, Professor Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng, Minister of Environment, Science, Technology and Innovation said in a speech  read on his behalf, that International Energy Agency had revealed, world-wide transport sector accounts for about 50 per cent of world energy consumption while transport consumes 25 per cent of the world’s energy with 90 per cent for fossil fuels,adding that the transport sector also has the fastest greenhouse emissions  which is 2.5% per annum .

He said this is projected to increase due to over dependency on fuel powered vehicles.

“Indeed, total new vehicle sales estimated at 88 million units in 2014 (OICA, 2014), of which about 65 million are light vehicles, are expected to increase to 107 million by 2020 (Economist, 2013), he said.

Prof Frimpong-Boateng said Ghana is has initiated interventions such as the introduction of Bus transport system to reduce the number of vehicle use  and its associated environmental implications.

Prof Frimpong-Boateng said further that ,his Ministry under the Global Fuel Economy Initiative and ECOWAS low Sulphur Fuel Initiative, collaborated with the Ministry of Energy to also reduce sulphur standards of diesel and petrol fuels from 3000ppm and 1000ppm respectively to 50ppm since September 1, 2017.

The Minister assured  that the Ministry will continue to explore other prudent policy interventions to reduce fuel consumption to conserve environmental quality adding “intervention that could go a long way to remedy the situation may involve the introduction of policies for fuel economy standards in Ghana,”